Cinque Terre, The Five Lands

The area known in Cinque Terre, a series of five villages along the Italian Riviera northwest of Florence, is mentioned in documents dating as far back as the 11th century.  Monterosso al Mare, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, Riomaggiore and the coastline connecting them make up the Cinque Terre National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Limoni
The little path that winds down
along the slope plunges through cane-tufts
and opens suddenly into the orchard
among the moss-green trunks
of the lemon trees.
— Nobel Laureate in Literature, Eugenio Montale, 1921

While Montale originally trekked to the village on foot, these days there is a train from La Spezia that will take you to any of the five villages within a half an hour. Even if you have a car, it is recommended that you park in La Spezia and take the train the rest of the way, as the mountain roads are often only one lane, and the main road stops about a kilometer from Vernazza. Walking the historic trails, however, is something not to be skipped. The walking (and biking) paths spider web across the area, connecting the villages and surrounding sights.  Plan for a multiple day visit to give yourself enough time to walk through the vineyards and olive orchards, to trek between villages, and just to explore.

While many of the trails are perfect for a short walk, for some of the village to village paths, plan on bringing a picnic lunch and enjoying the view of the Mediterranean as you eat. You will need a trekking pass to access the trails during peak season, but during the off season it’s not something you need to worry about.

At the end of a long day’s scenic walk, you can enjoy one of the area’s many divine restaurants featuring such specialties as Monterosso Anchovies, Ligurian Pesto, and Farinata, a savory pancake-like snack made from chickpea flour. And, of course, the gelato made with honey from Corniglia is the perfect dessert. Once your appetite has been properly satiated, it’s simple to catch a train or shuttle back to your starting point. It’s actually a bit safer to do that than walk back as the area is populated by wild boar who like to roam the trails at night.

The predominant industry in Cinque Terre was traditionally grapes and olives, but in the 1970s, the brightly painted fishermen’s cottages perched on the terraced cliffs and hills began to be marketed as a tourist attraction, and tourism has been the primary industry since. In fact, tourism has become so important in Cinque Terre that even when there is a transport strike, at least half the trains through the area continue to run to ensure that vacations go on as planned.

With beaches, exceptional hiking trails and historic World War II bunkers, there is a little something for everyone in Cinque Terre. Endless Travel can make your trip to Italy a walk in the woods. Reach out to us today.

Literary and Popular Media References

Dante compares the rugged cliffs of Purgatory with Cinque Terre in the Divine Comedy.

In Faville del Maglio, Gabriele D’Annunzio mentions the region’s Sciachetrà white wine.

Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street shot scenes in Cinque Terre.

Pompeii and the Amalfi Coast

In 79 AD Mt. Vesuvius erupted in what may be one of the most famous disasters of all time. While eyewitness accounts of the eruption were recorded, records of the towns surrounding Vesuvius’ base, including Pompeii, were lost to history. The city lay buried in volcanic ash until 1592, but excavation wouldn’t start in earnest until 1764, and since then Pompeii and its sister town of Herculaneum have been popular tourist destinations, attracting nearly 2.6 million visitors a year by the early part of the 21st century.

The ruins of Pompeii

Even though barely a third of the excavated buildings are accessible to the public, the open sections of the city are extensive, and you may be better off hiring a guide to take you through the ruins — it’s worth every penny. You should set aside at LEAST a whole day to explore Pompeii to get a solid understanding of the city and its history.

There is a weighty seriousness as you walk around the arena and cemetery… the people who lived here fled in terror nearly two thousand years ago, and some of those who didn’t escape have been preserved as plaster casts which are viewable near the public entrance. But their homes and their art have been left behind for us to explore. Frescos, mosaics, and beautifully carved fountains are around every corner. And every one of those fountains is carved differently as they served as street signs as well as meeting point designators. Finally, at the end of the day, when your feet are tired and your brain is full, stop and enjoy the mystical sunset.

If time permits, spend a second day exploring the city of Herculaneum. Unlike Pompeii, the ash and lava that encased Herculaneum carbonized, preserving wood and other organic materials such as beds, food, and skeletons.  Herculaneum’s library was found to contain over 1800 carbonized scrolls, which are slowly being unrolled and deciphered digitally thanks to modern technology that allows us to differentiate between ink and carbonized papyrus.

When your historic explorations are done, it’s time to hop in a car and head south towards Sorrento. Sitting on the southern shore of the Bay of Naples, Sorrento is one of the most notable tourist destinations in Italy.  Visited by such venerable figures as Charles Dickens, Lord Byron, Goethe, Henrik Ibsen, Keats and Walter Scott, it is a popular tourist spot for many reasons. First and foremost, the views from Sorrento and the surrounding area are beyond picturesque. The city itself may be one of the most photogenic spots in all of Europe. With small shops, museums, and the 14th century Cathedral of Sorrento, it is a picturesque stop on your way towards the Amalfi Coast.

The part of the Mediterranean Sea surrounded by Italy, Corsica, Sardinia and Sicily is more commonly known as the Tyrrhenian Sea. Jutting out from the ankle of Italy’s boot, on the southern coast of the Sorrentine Peninsula, is the Amalfi Coast. As you drive through the mountains and along the shore, you may recognize some of the vistas as the island of Themyscira from 2017’s Wonder Woman. Stopping in Positano for gelato, you’ll find yourself in the middle of some of the filming locations from Under the Tuscan Sun. And if you are a fan of Fellini, you may recognize shots from his movie Roma while you make your way back towards mainland Italy.

Rich with history and breathtaking vistas, the area around the Gulf of Naples could occupy a significant part of any Italian adventure. Let Endless Travel help you plan your trip so you get the most out of your time under the Salerno sun.


Literary References:
John Webster’s tragedy The Duchess of Malfi.
John Steinbeck’s short story Positano.
William James’ Finding Positano, A Love Story.
You can also find several works by M.C. Escher featuring the Amalfi Coast.

Rick

Joyce,

I want to thank you for putting together a wonderful itinerary for our trip to Italy.  I found the hotels to be convenient and very comfortable, the suggested tours were very important to help enjoy the sites. The train rides were convenient and very easy to board with the bags. The trip went as smoothly as I would have ever expected when you travel internationally.

All want to say is that you helped make the trip with my daughter and her friend Emily a wonderful experience.

Grazie,

Rick