Éire, also known as Ireland, is the second largest of the British Isles, and is split into two countries, The Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. From coast to coast, the Emerald Isle is awash in beautiful vistas and historic and cultural venues.

Donegal farm, Photo by Heather Mount

Many visitors begin their explorations in Dublin, the capital and largest city in Ireland.  With the youngest population of any city in Europe (about half the population of the city is 25 or under), Dublin is never in short supply of adventure. One of the most walkable cities in Europe, Dublin has something for everyone.

With a vibrant theater and performance scene, a plethora of art galleries, museums, monuments and historic buildings, the arts lovers will never be at a loss for something to do. The sports fanatics can watch rugby, cricket or soccer from most any of the city’s 667 licensed pubs. And there are even a number of nature trails within a stones throw of the city. Whether watching the numerous and varied street performers, exploring the grounds of Trinity College, or drinking one of the ten million pints of Guinness produced in Dublin every single day, you could easily spend an entire vacation in Dublin alone, but Ireland offers so much more.

At the southwestern edge of County Clare’s Burren region you will find the iconic views provided by the Cliffs of Moher.  Running about eight and a half miles along the coast, the cliffs vary from 400 to 700 feet above the sea. Continuing south, you’ll come across the Gap of Dunloe where you can bike or hike along the winding mountain pass. And for the ultimate local experience, you can hire a trap and pony to take you on a horse drawn carriage ride to see the Gap’s five lakes.

The Gap of Dunloe sits within the Ring of Kerry, a scenic, 111 mile circular route through County Kerry. Along the ring, travelers will find epic vistas, classic pubs and historic landmarks such as Ballymalis Castle, St. Mary’s Cathedral, and Beehive Cells. For the hearty adventurer, there is also The Ring of Kerry cycling path (using older, quieter roads), and The Kerry Way, which takes its own signposted route.

The centuries of social and political fluctuation in Ireland has impacted the cuisine. Custom, conquest, and cultivation all changed the tenor of Irish food, culminating in the diverse menus we find today. Black pudding, poundies, curry chips, scones, fried bread, spiced beef and Irish stew are among the varied traditional foods you can find throughout the country. And for a uniquely Irish experience, you can find The Oratory Pizza & Wine Bar in Cahersiveen along the Ring of Kerry.  Built in an old church, they serve gourmet pizza and a wide selection of wines.

And of course, Ireland is home to numerous authors. WB Yeats, Oscar Wilde, Frank McCourt, James Joyce, George Bernard Shaw, CS Lewis, Seamus Heaney, Jonathan Swift and Maeve Binchy are only the tip of the Irish literary iceberg. May and June feature the Belfast Book Festival, the Bloomsday Festival, Yeats Day and the International Literature Festival Dublin.  A UNESCO City of Literature, Dublin is packed with landmarks honoring Ireland’s literary greats.

Ireland has adventures for everyone, and as Lady Gregory once said “I feel more and more the time wasted that is not spent in Ireland.”

Post written by Mindy Hanson, AlphaPixel Reach for Endless Travel.  

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