Wales, The Hidden Gem of the British Isles

Tucked unobtrusively along the southwestern edge of England, Wales is a picturesque nation often overlooked by travelers. With a population of approximately three million people, the Welsh are outnumbered by their sheep by a ratio of 4:1.  And while this makes it a wonderful destination for oviphiles, Wales has much, much more to offer.

One of the first things most people notice as they explore the towns nestled in the rolling green hills and atop the steep slate cliffs is that every town has a church.  As the majority of early villages were founded by a Lord or landowner as they built their homes, most towns have a castle or manor house — and an accompanying church for which the town is generally named.  When you see “llan” (church) in a place name, odds are there is a house of worship close by.

Wales is a country rich in culture and legend passed down orally, by the cynfeirdd (early poets). This includes the earliest version of the legends of King Arthur, which are reflected to this day in the Welsh flag: a red dragon on a field of green. The red dragon is the nation’s mascot and is believed to have been the battle standard of Arthur and other ancient leaders. Some believe to this day that Camelot was in Wales and that its ruins can still be seen at Caerwent.

But Wales is not in short supply of other castles and ruins to explore. Tinturn Abbey, situated in Monmouthshire, on the Welsh bank of the River Wye, is the focus of Gordon Masters’ historical novel The Secrets of Tintern Abbey dramatizing the 400-year history of the Cistercian community there. Castell Conwy is a medieval fortification in Conwy, on the north coast of Wales, built by Edward I. You can walk around the city of Conwy atop its defensive walls. In fact, Wales is believed to have more castles per square mile than anywhere else in the world.

Visiting in the spring or summer gives you the best opportunity to explore places like Bodant Garden, where you can spend hours wandering the winding pathways that meander through forests, lakes and flowers. Make sure to stop for tea and scones in Llandudno, a north Victorian seaside village with exceptional restaurants and breathtaking scenery. For those who appreciate the unique, a visit to Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyllllantysiliogogogoch in North Wales is always in order. Translated as “The church of St. Mary in the hollow of white hazel trees near the rapid whirlpool by St. Tysilio’s of the red cave,” it is believed to be the longest place name in the world.

No scenic tour of Wales is complete without a trip on the railway to the top of Mount Snowdon in Snowdonia National Park. The Welsh name – Yr Wyddfa – means “the barrow” which may refer to the cairn ( mound of rough stones built as a memorial) thrown over the legendary giant Rhitta Gawr after his defeat by King Arthur.

And the beautiful oddity of Wales is Portmeirion, a tourist village in Gwynedd. Designed and built by Sir Clough Williams-Ellis, Portmeirion is an Italian village in the middle of Wales, created because he was tired of traveling between Wales and Italy. The village has long been a source of inspiration for writers such as Noël Coward, who wrote Blithe Spirit while staying there.

For a small country not often on the tourist radar, Wales has a wealth of culture, history, and scenery for those who want to spend a serene holiday just a little bit off the beaten path. 

TU HWNT I’R BONT TEAROOM https://www.tuhwntirbont.co.uk/

Blog post written by and images copyright Mindy Hanson, AlphaPixel Reach.